Swimming Cows

Visiting a museum in Dunkeld, Scotland, a few months ago, I came across the term ‘swimming cows’ for the first time.

Back in the day, droving cattle from the Highlands down to the markets in Crieff and Falkirk was huge business and the major source of income in the Highlands. From Crieff, the cattle were herded south to England, where their meat was in great demand.  At the peak of the industry, 100,000 cattle left the Highlands every year. The droving way of life only fell into decline with the arrival of the railroads in the mid-19th Century.

But what has this to do with ‘swimming cows’?  In the days before bridges were available – or their tolls affordable – the cattle had to be swum across rivers. If the lead cow could be persuaded into the water, the herd would follow. But occasionally, if his herd balked at crossing a particular river, the drover might hire a local ‘swimming cow’ to lead the cattle safely across. This ‘swimming cow’ would then be returned home to await being called on by another herd.

Even in this day and age, cattle are still swum across rivers or seas to fresh pastures. I came across this article about a farmer in Skye who swims his herd across the water to fresh pastures every year.  Now in his 80s, he used to swim alongside them, but now accompanies the herd in a row-boat.

And if you’re wondering what happened to the drovers when their industry collapsed, many travelled to America and became cowboys on the famous Cowboy Trails.

If you’re interested in learning more, please check out this documentary of a modern-day recreation of a drove from the Isle of Skye to Crieff.

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2 thoughts on “Swimming Cows

  1. Loved reading this! I have an uncle who lives in Glenelg and that’s one of the places where, in times gone by, cattle were swum across from Skye to the mainland. More recently a friend told me about landing cattle from a small boat onto an island where there was no jetty and the cattle had to be encouraged off the boat to wade ashore. Apparently there is often a lead animal that the others follow. There were only two men, both of whom had to be on the boat to get the cattle off and so the lead animal was kept on the boat to last. If it were allowed to swim to shore first it would move off and the other beasts would simply follow after it. So by keeping that particular animal to last meant the others waited patiently on the shore till the men were ready to take them to the new farm!

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